Spring 2024 Member Showcase

We had an exciting Spring quarter here at PCNW, and our members keep impressing us with the work they shared for our spring quarter Member Spotlight submissions. This quarter we are featuring  Rachel Crick (and the crew at As Many Weirdos As Possible), Patrick Names, and Katrina Herzog. We often receive more submissions than we can feature, so if you were not selected, please feel free to submit again, especially if you have new work, so we can consider you for next quarter’s spotlight. 

The next deadline is August 8th, 2024 for our summer quarter spotlight. Submit your images here.

Not a member, but interested in this opportunity? You can sign up here. Membership benefits not only include highlights like this one, you also receive discounts on classes, workshops, facilities rentals, and merchandise; as well as perks that include 20% off rentals, 10% off inkjet paper, 10% off darkroom paper & chemicals at Glazer’s Camera, and 10% Off Framing Services at Lucky Rabbet Framing.

What are you working on?

Poser Productions LLC focuses on still life documentary photography projects and storytelling. We take portraits, collect stories, and work with bringing communities together via live events, music (concerts) and pop-up events.

Artist Statement

Photographing as many weirdos as possible, one at a time. 

As Many Weirdos As Possible (A.M.W.A.P.) is a still life documentary project focusing on the people who made and supported music in the Pacific Northwest circa 1985-1995. All the music, all the genres – from hip hop to metal, journalists to record store cashiers – we were the music. As Seattle continues to evolve into a tech-town and the places where history happened are being displaced, we know our stories must be told.

The name was given to us by Art Chantry, who asked if our plan was to “photograph as many weirdos as possible.” Five photographers, Rachel Crick, Rosetta Greek, Lance Mercer, Niffer Calderwood and Chris Pugh are taking portraits of individuals who were influential in the Pacific Northwest music community in places that tie them to their story. Each participant is asked to share a favorite anecdotal memory from this time, in their handwriting, on an 8.5 X 11 piece of paper. These handwritten memories will accompany the individual portraits. The legacy of this project is twofold: a gallery show and a published book. 

Pamela Houle, Senior Producer, founded the Greenwood Music Crawl, and is a walking encyclopedia of musical knowledge. Creative Director Nate Johnson, Graphic Designer Jay Barber and Advisor Ricardo Frazer round out our core team.  A.M.W.A.P. is supported by a great team of volunteers and brought to you by Poser Productions.

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Instagram

Self portrait by Patrick Names

What are you working on?

I have been working on a photo documentary project about the basketball culture in the Philippines and how the game permeates into every facet of Filipino life.  See my artist statement below for more information.

Project Description

“Children of the Mist” (batang hamog) is a borrowed term from the Filipino language that has been applied to the crazy obsessive basketball culture of the Philippines. This saying specifically refers to the poverty-stricken youth of the country, living in the shadows of the slums, that appear and vanish just as quickly as mist in the night. The children who flock to basketball hoops and courts after the sun falls have also been referred to by this title. Metro Manila is one of the most densely populated cities in the world, with shantytowns packed with locals and families enduring extreme poverty, harsh climates, and unrelenting pollution. For the people who grow up here, there is an escape–a place where they can forget the harsh reality of their everyday lives, even just for a moment. This escape can be found on just about every block and street corner in the city. This is the game of basketball.  

Imported and learned from the American military bases during World War I, the Filipino sport culture adopted the game of basketball, and it quickly became entwined within the fabric of everyday life. From makeshift neighborhood hoops to the arenas of the professional leagues, basketball is everywhere. It is even played among the tombs of the city’s cemeteries by the squatters who take up residence there. The rural areas and islands in the Philippines are no exception to the basketball-crazed streets of the big cities, like Manila. Instead of courts surrounded by busy traffic, decomposing concrete apartment buildings, and rickety townships, the courts of the rural islands are framed by tall palm trees, open fields of grazing cattle, and modest multi-generational family homes. Life is much slower here, quieter and calmer, but the love for the game of basketball is no less passionate. So much so that most of the children and adults play barefoot, pounding away at the concrete with only their exposed soles to protect them. 

Riding around the islands on my motorbike or in a taxi in the city, I could not help to notice all the courts and hoops I would pass and all the people that were using them. Growing up as a total basketball junkie and a “gym rat” myself, I was quickly drawn to the basketball culture in the Philippines as I would watch the locals play during the last hours of the day, escaping the heat and humidity. This connection was one I was longing for, being halfway around the world, homesick and alone. This project was the organic melding of three life-long loves: travel, photography, and basketball.  So “Children of the Mist” was born–it is my documentation of the deeply passionate and obsessive Filipino basketball culture, both in rural and urban settings, my connection to this foreign land and the people through a familiar and equally loved game, and how the game influences everyday life in the Philippines

Website

Instagram

Self portrait by Katrina Herzog

What are you working on?

Over the last ten years, I have been gifted old film from friends and family with expiration dates ranging from 1982 to 2019. The results as I’ve been working through this stock of film have been unpredictable; often the color of the film looks true-to-life, but occasionally an entire roll of film comes back tinted – blues, orange, purple. Instead of viewing it as a loss, I’ve delighted in the effect and now find myself hoping for the unexpected to happen when I get my film developed.

Artist Statement

In my 20s I studied photography and worked as a documentary photographer. I focused on precision, details, and meaningful visual storytelling. In my 30s I shifted careers and became a social worker, where my focus turned toward supporting people through various healing and accessing needed resources. Utilizing creativity for my own healing and expression, I have moved toward engaging with photography as a process rather than a product — using resources I already have while letting go of control of the outcome.

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